Dual flush vs single flush

Dual Flush vs Single Flush Toilet Comparison

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Whether you are acquiring a new place to live, or remodeling your current one, at some point, you will arrive at the bathroom. You will then have to decide between a dual flush vs single flush toilet. Depending on your circumstances, one may be more suitable than the other.

The most common toilet(and one that everybody has seen) is the single flush toilet. As the name implies, single flush toilets come with one flush mechanism.

Thus all everything that needs to be flushed is done so with the same quantity of water.

On the other hand, dual flush toilets include two mechanisms for flushing down waste, namely, two buttons instead of one lever, which you can spot at the top of the tank.

The two buttons differentiate from one another in the amount of water used to flush. One of the two buttons flushes more water per gallon and is meant for more solid waste while the other is used for flushing down liquid waste.

Dual flush toilets rely on gravity to flush down waste, a difference from siphon-flush toilets. Mainly, siphon-flush toilets use more water.

Whichever you one you purchase for your house, it is essential that you know as much as possible about each to choose the best type.

Which is better dual flush or single flush?

This comes down to each household and its users. It is no secret that single flush toilets(also known as gravity toilets) have been around much longer and are thus more accessible.

They have been the standard toilet in the market for years. Meaning, single flush toilet models are a lot more common than dual flush toilets.

Thus, providing maintenance to single flush toilets is a lot easier. You will spend less time looking for parts for your toilet tank with a single flush toilet. Additionally, the cost of these parts will be cheaper in addition to less difficult to find.

The availability of parts and how easily they can be replaced with anything toilet-related is something we talk about quite often.  Whether to buy a new toilet or to look for components such as a fill valve, availability is essential.

Nevertheless, it is essential to note that the single flush model uses a lot of gallons of water per flush. Making it significantly more expensive and doing a lot more ecological harm.

Something users think about compared to dual flush toilets. Each flush from a single lever flush is typically measured at 1.28 GPF(gallons per flush), which is under the federal standard in United States regulations.

On the other hand, dual flush toilets are more eco-friendly, thanks to the tank using significantly fewer gallons of water compared to single flush toilets.

It cannot be understated that being able to distinguish when to flush liquid waste vs solid waste in the bowl is key to efficiency and a healthier toilet tank.

However, at times dual flush toilets are more difficult to flush because of the flush button. People find it easy to use the lever, and a flush button can result in more stress in flushing compared to a single flush toilet’s lever.

You often hear people complaining about having the button not being easy to use when they see advertising of dual flush toilets. Furthermore, it is undeniable that no matter how many gallons per flush you save, for disabled people, a lever may be easier to use. 

Finally, and essential, is the fact that because dual flush toilets are not as standard as single-flush options. You will not count on the high-efficiency of finding easily replaceable parts in regards to maintenance.

While this is subject to change in the future, with more advertising, for now, a single flush toilet features more plumbing efficiency should you need to change anything.

Moreover, replacement parts are more expensive with a dual option.

However, do keep in mind that with dual-flush toilets, you are saving more money on gallons of water being used. Which, in the long run may upset any minimal increase in cost should you ever need to replace any parts of the bowl.

Another way you might want to look at it is depending on the size of your household and the volume of visitors/users of your main toilet bowl. Obviously, for bigger homes a dual-flush toilet might seem more reasonable from an economical and ecological point of view.  You are using more water, hence having the option of a dual flush button might be crucial. However, it may get confusing for guests, so a single flush toilet is better for households with many visitors.

Alternatively, you can make the toilet being used for visitors a single flush option and the private toilet a dual flush. Thus having both systems if you can handle it.

On the other hand, the decorative or aesthetic element that your choice offers is also essential. It is easier to install a lever and provide real decorative value compared to a flush button.

Also, keep in mind that dual flush toilets are expanding. They are universally adopted in countries like Australia, Singapore, and New Zealand, and we see no reason why this trend won’t continue.

So at the very least, please familiarize yourself with the option should you go with a single flush toilet; there is plenty of content online about it.

Final thoughts

Finding the right toilet for your household comes down to your household’s particular needs.

When thinking of a dual flush vs single flush toilet, first determine the users of your toilets, and whether water-saving consumption and ease of use are critical for your choice.

Additionally, if you feel a bit uneasy about any future maintenance your toilet may need. The ease of finding parts in places such as Amazon should give you a sign of what type of toilet to target. The result should be an efficient toilet.

Nevertheless, we believe you cannot go with either choice. If you are eco-friendly and want to go with a dual-flush toilet, or if you’re going to keep it simple for your visitors with a single flush toilet, the choice is yours. Eventually, you will also see more wireless flush options as well, so keep an open mind to the possibility of trying something new. 

PS. We also wrote a great guide on automatic toilet bowl cleaners, which you can read here. If you have any questions, please be sure to drop us an email and give us your thoughts on our posts.

Resources:

Wikipedia

Kohler

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